Targeting your Stained Glass Market

This week’s video is coming to you on location at Sci-Fi on the Rock 7! If you are wondering where you might be able to sell your stained glass, or have been considering how to market your stained glass creations, this video may help:

Remember, think outside the box and be creative with your marketing, but focus in on theĀ  people who may appreciate your glass. There are more places to consider than just Farmer’s markets and holiday gift shows. If you are on the right track and making what you love, marketing your glass should be fun!

Which audience would enjoy your glass? Who is your target market and where do they hang out? Post your answer below.

 

 

Putting a price on your stained glass

If you have made a few pieces of stained glass and are thinking about selling them to make a little extra money, or if you are considering turning your stained glass hobby into a part-time business, you may be wondering what price to put on your glass. This video explains a few methods (thanks to Paula from A.J Stained Glass in Toronto for teaching me this method five years ago!)

The individual piece method of costing your stained glass art takes the following into consideration:

  • Size of each individual piece (bigger glass costs more)
  • Shape of each individual piece (curves take longer to create thus should cost more)
  • Source of each individual piece (did you find the glass locally or purchase overseas?)
  • Colour of each individual piece (orange/fuchsia are pricey colours due to mineral content)
  • Other factors of each piece (hand rolled glass or specialty glass costs more)

If each piece is on the cheaper end, you may want to price is around $2. If it is on the higher end, $5 may be a good range. However, keep in mind that this is a general gauge, and depends on where you are living, as well as inflation and the price of minerals and metals at any given time.

After you’ve assessed each piece, add them up! For example, If I’ve created a stained glass panel using 50 pieces of glass, and I’ve assessed that 10 pieces are worth $2 each, 10 pieces are worth $3, and 30 pieces are worth $5 each, then I will set my panel price at (10 x $2) + (10 X $3) + (30 x $5) = $200

Don’t forget to add on the following costs as you feel necessary:

  • Time cost for design
  • Time cost for pattern creation
  • Time cost for glass creation

You may also want to add on additional costs for the following:

  • Using lead-free solder (the silver content adds to the cost)
  • Framing your piece (not all small pieces are framed)
  • Shipping (if you sell online)
  • Taxes

Finally, consider the quality of the overall piece. You may be very pleased and proud of your new creation (and so you should!) but it takes time to gain expertise in any craft or art. As you progress, you’ll be able to raise your prices, but as a beginner, be reasonable with your selling price. Don’t undervalue your time or effort, and make sure you are compensated for your materials cost, but don’t set such a high price that people are turned off from purchasing! If you use the $2 – $5 method, you’ll have a leg to stand on when people ask you why your work costs what it does.

Many people see stained glass as being pricey, but if you are able to explain the reasons behind the cost, you’ll be on your way to making your first of many sales. Congratulations!